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Breathing and Exchange of Gases: NEET MCQ Questions [100+ Solved]

Below are the NEET MCQ questions on Class 11 Biology Chapter “Breathing and Exchange of Gases” based on the NCERT textbook. Solve the below free NEET mock test for a better understanding of the various topics. 100+ important MCQs (multiple choice questions) are given in this NEET question bank.

“Breathing and Exchange of Gases” is the 17th chapter in the unit “Human Physiology” of class XI or class 11th Biology NCERT. Do note that NEET (which is conducted by NTA) is based on NCERT textbooks so they are a must-have. You can also download PDFs of NCERT textbooks.

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I hope this will help you practice better for the NEET exam. All the best!


  1. When there is a shortage of oxygen in the body, which organ is most affected?
    (a) Intestine
    (b) Skin
    (c) Kidney
    (d) Brain

(d) Brain

  1. What causes oxygen to move through the alveolar blood capillaries of the lungs?
    (a) Difference in the O2 tension and partial pressure of these chambers
    (b) Partial pressure of CO2
    (c) Union of O2 with haemoglobin
    (d) All of the above

(a) Difference in the O2 tension and partial pressure of these chambers

  1. What can be used to represent functional residual capacity?
    (a) TV + ERV
    (b) ERV + RV
    (c) RV + IRV
    (d) ERV + TV + IRV

(b) ERV + RV

  1. In addition to respiratory function, the lungs also play a role in?
    (a) Excretion
    (b) Temperature regulation
    (c) pH regulation
    (d) Maintaining the balance of body

(b) Temperature regulation

  1. What will happen if only the thoracic wall is punctured and not the lungs?
    (a) The lungs get inflated
    (b) The man dies as the lungs get collapsed
    (c) The breathing rate decreases
    (d) The breathing rate increases

(b) The man dies as the lungs get collapsed

  1. The entry of which substance from plasma balances the increased hydrogen ion concentration in RBC when bicarbonate ions diffuse from RBC into plasma during the transport of CO2?
    (a) Water
    (b) Oxygen
    (c) Hydroxyl ions
    (d) Chloride ions

(d) Chloride ions

  1. A person living at sea level has around 5 million RBCs per cubic millimeter of blood, whereas one living at an altitude of 5400 metres has around 8 million. This is because at high altitude
    (a) atmospheric O2 level is less and hence more RBCs are needed to absorb the required amount of O2 to survive
    (b) there is more UV radiation which enhances RBC production
    (c) people eat more nutritive food, therefore more RBCs are formed
    (d) people get pollution – free air to breathe and more oxygen is available

(a) atmospheric O2 level is less and hence more RBCs are needed to absorb the required amount of O2 to survive

  1. Which of the following statements is false?
    (a) The partial pressure of oxygen in deoxygenated blood is 40 mm Hg
    (b) The partial pressure of oxygen in oxygenated blood is 95 mm Hg
    (c) The partial pressure of oxygen in the alveolar air is 104 mm Hg
    (d) The partial pressure of carbon dioxide in deoxygenated blood is 95 mm Hg

(d) The partial pressure of carbon dioxide in deoxygenated blood is 95 mm Hg

  1. Why do we not respire for some seconds after taking a long deep breath?
    (a) More CO2 in the blood
    (b) More O2 in the blood
    (c) Less CO2 in the blood
    (d) Less O2 in the blood

(c) Less CO2 in the blood

  1. Ascent of high mountains may cause altitude sickness in men. What is the main cause of this?
    (a) Excess of CO2 in blood
    (b) Decreased efficiency of haemoglobin
    (c) Decreased partial pressure of oxygen
    (d) Decreased proportion of oxygen in the air

(c) Decreased partial pressure of oxygen

  1. Due to flattening of tracheal vessels, alveoli are deprived of oxygen in which disease?
    (a) Bronchitis
    (b) Asthma
    (c) Pneumonia
    (d) Emphysema

(d) Emphysema

  1. An increase in lung ventilation rate is caused by which of the following conditions?
    (a) Increase of CO2 content in inhaled air
    (b) Increase of CO2 content in exhaled air
    (c) Decrease of O2 content in inhaled air
    (d) Decrease of O2 content in exhaled air

(a) Increase of CO2 content in inhaled air

  1. What controls the rate of breathing?
    (a) The amount of freely available oxygen
    (b) Amount of carbon dioxide
    (c) Muscular function of the body
    (d) Stress

(b) Amount of carbon dioxide

  1. In lungs there is a definite exchange of ions between RBC and plasma. What is involved in the removal of CO2 from blood?
    (a) Influx of Cl– ions into RBC
    (b) Influx of HCO3– ions into RBC
    (c) Efflux of Cl– ions into RBC
    (d) Efflux of HCO3– ions into RBC

(d) Efflux of HCO3– ions into RBC

  1. Where is maximum amount of oxygen lost from the blood?
    (a) Capillaries surrounding the tissue cells
    (b) Arteries of the body
    (c) Capillaries surrounding the alveoli
    (d) Left auricle of the heart

(c) Capillaries surrounding the alveoli

  1. In an adult male Periplaneta americana, which of the following paths does air/O2 take during respiration as it enters the body?
    (a) Hypopharynx, mouth, pharynx, trachea, tissues
    (b) Spiracle in metathorax, trachea, tracheoles, oxygen diffuses into cells
    (c) Mouth, bronchial tube, trachea, oxygen enters cells
    (d) Spiracles in prothorax, tracheoles, trachea, oxygen diffuses into cells

(b) Spiracle in metathorax, trachea, tracheoles, oxygen diffuses into cells

  1. When the haemoglobin content of the blood decreases, what disease occurs?
    (a) pleurisy
    (b) emphysema
    (c) anaemia
    (d) pneumonia

(c) anaemia

  1. Which of the following statements are true/false?
    (1) The blood transports CO2 comparatively easily because of its higher solubility.
    (2) Approximately 8.9% of CO2 is transported by being dissolved in the plasma of blood.
    (3) The carbon dioxide produced by the tissues, diffuses passively into the bloodstream and passes into red blood corpuscles and reacts with water to form H2CO3.
    (4) The oxyhaemoglobin (HbO2) of the erythrocytes is basic.
    (5) The chloride ions diffuse from plasma into the erythrocytes to maintain ionic balance.
    (a) (1), (3) and (5) are true, (2) and (4) are false.
    (b) (1), (3) and (5) are false, (2) and (4) are true.
    (c) (1), (2) and (4) are true, (3) and (5) are false.
    (d) (1), (2) and (4) are false, (3) and (5) are true.

(a) (1), (3) and (5) are true, (2) and (4) are false.

  1. Why is respiration in insects called direct?
    (a) the cells exchange O2/CO2 directly with the air in the tubes
    (b) the tissues exchanges O2/CO2 directly with coelomic fluid
    (c) the tissue exchanges O2/CO2 directly with the air outside through the body surface
    (d) tracheal tubes exchange O2/CO2 directly with the haemocoel which then exchanges with tissues

(d) tracheal tubes exchange O2/CO2 directly with the haemocoel which then exchanges with tissues

  1. Regarding the functions of our respiratory system, mark the wrong statement.
    (a) Humidifies air
    (b) Warms up the air
    (c) Diffusion of gases
    (d) Cleans up the air

(c) Diffusion of gases

  1. A person suffers punctures in his chest cavity in an accident. What could be it’s effects without any damage to the lungs?
    (a) reduced breathing rate
    (b) rapid increase in breathing rate
    (c) no change in respiration
    (d) cessation of breathing

(d) cessation of breathing

  1. Why is exposure to carbon monoxide harmful to animals?
    (a) it reduces CO2 transport
    (b) it reduces O2 transport
    (c) it increases CO2 transport
    (d) it increases O2 transport

(b) it reduces O2 transport

  1. Regarding normal breathing. mark the true statement among the following.
    (a) inspiration is a passive process whereas expiration is active
    (b) inspiration is an active process whereas expiration is passive
    (c) inspiration and expiration are active processes
    (d) inspiration and expiration are passive processes

(b) inspiration is an active process whereas expiration is passive

  1. After forced expiration, someone breathes in some volume of air by forced inspiration. What is this quantity of air taken in called?
    (a) total lung capacity
    (b) tidal volume
    (c) vital capacity
    (d) inspiratory capacity

(c) vital capacity

  1. In context to O2 binding to Hb, mark the incorrect statement.
    (a) higher pH
    (b) lower temperature
    (c) lower pCO2
    (d) higher pO2

(d) higher pO2

  1. Mark the correct pair of muscles involved in normal breathing in humans.
    (a) External and internal intercostal muscles
    (b) Diaphragm and abdominal muscles
    (c) Diaphragm and external intercostal muscles
    (d) Diaphragm and intercostal muscles

(d) Diaphragm and intercostal muscles

  1. Incidence of emphysema, a respiratory disorder is high in cigarette smokers. What is found in such cases?
    (a) the bronchioles are found damaged
    (b) the alveolar walls are found damaged
    (c) the plasma membrane is found damaged
    (d) the respiratory muscles are found damaged

(b) the alveolar walls are found damaged

  1. Certain specialized centres in the brain regulate the respiratory process. Which one of the following centres can reduce the inspiratory duration upon stimulation.
    (a) Medullary inspiratory centre
    (b) Pneumotaxic centre
    (c) Apneustic centre
    (d) Chemosensitive centre

(b) Pneumotaxic centre

  1. When does CO2 dissociate from carbamino haemoglobin?
    (a) pCO2 is high and pO2 is low
    (b) pO2 is high and pCO2 is low
    (c) pCO2 and pO2 are equal
    (d) None of the above

(b) pO2 is high and pCO2 is low

  1. Using what can air volume be estimated in breathing movements?
    (a) stethoscope
    (b) hygrometer
    (c) sphygmomanometer
    (d) spirometer

(d) spirometer

  1. Mark the correct option from the following relationships between respiratory volume and capacities.
    (i) Inspiratory Capacity (IC) = Tidal Volume + Residual Volume
    (ii) Vital Capacity (VC) = Tidal Volume (TV) + Inspiratory Reserve Volume (IRV) + Expiratory Reserve Volume (ERV) .
    (iii) Residual Volume (RV) = Vital Capacity (VC) – Inspiratory Reserve Volume (IRV)
    (iv) Tidal Volume (TV) = Inspiratory Capacity (IC) – Inspiratory Reserve Volume (IRV)
    Codes
    (a) (i) Incorrect, (ii) Incorrect, (iii) Incorrect, (iv) Correct
    (b) (i) Incorrect, (ii) Correct, (iii) Incorrect, (iv) Correct
    (c) (i) Correct, (ii) Correct, (iii) Incorrect. (iv) Correct
    (d) (i) Correct, (ii) Incorrect, (iii) Correct, (iv) Incorrect

(b) (i) Incorrect, (ii) Correct, (iii) Incorrect, (iv) Correct

  1. There will be a right shift in the oxygen-haemoglobin dissociation curve in the case of?
    (a) high pCO2
    (b) high pO2
    (c) low pCO2
    (d) less H+ concentration

(a) high pCO2

  1. What is an oxidative breakdown of respiratory substrates with the help of O2 called?
    (a) fermentation
    (b) anaerobic respiration
    (c) R. Q.
    (d) aerobic respiration

(d) aerobic respiration

  1. Which of the following statements is correct?
    (a) Respiratory centres are not affected by CO2
    (b) In humans vital capacity is just double the expiratory volume
    (c) A human lung has 103 alveoli
    (d) During inspiration the lungs act as suction pumps

(d) During inspiration the lungs act as suction pumps

  1. Body tissues obtain oxygen from haemoglobin because of its dissociation in tissues caused by?
    (a) Low oxygen concentration and high carbon dioxide concentration
    (b) Low oxygen concentration
    (c) Low carbon dioxide concentration
    (d) High carbon dioxide concentration

(a) Low oxygen concentration and high carbon dioxide concentration

  1. When blood carbon dioxide concentrations rise, what happens to the breathing rate?
    (a) remain unaffected
    (b) decrease
    (c) stop
    (d) increase

(d) increase

  1. What happens during inspiration?
    (a) The diaphragm gets raised and ribs get lowered
    (b) Both diaphragm and ribs get raised
    (c) Both diaphragm and ribs get lowered
    (d) The diaphragm gets flattened and ribs get raised

(d) The diaphragm gets flattened and ribs get raised

  1. A normal man at rest inspires and expires about 500 millilitres of air. What is this amount known as?
    (a) complemental volume of air
    (b) tidal volume of air
    (c) reserve volume of air
    (d) residual volume of air

(b) tidal volume of air

  1. How much amount of O2 is delivered to the tissues under physiological conditions by 100 ml of oxygenated blood?
    (a) 5 ml
    (b) 25 ml
    (c) 50 ml
    (d) More the 50 ml

(a) 5 ml

  1. What would happen if the O2 concentration in tissues was almost as high as at the respiratory surface?
    (a) oxyhaemoglobin would dissociate to supply O2 to the tissues
    (b) haemoglobin would combine with more O2 to the tissues
    (c) oxyhaemoglobin would not dissociate to supply O2 to the tissues
    (d) CO2 will interfere with O2 transport.

(c) oxyhaemoglobin would not dissociate to supply O2 to the tissues

  1. All of the haemoglobin in the blood leaving the lungs gets oxygenated, so the tissues can receive oxygen from the blood. This is because
    (a) the tissues can absorb O2 from oxyhaemoglobin
    (b) O2 concentration in tissues is higher and CO2 concentration lower as compared to lungs
    (c) oxyhaemoglobin undergoes reduction
    (d) O2 concentration in tissues is lower and CO2 concentration higher than in lungs.

(b) O2 concentration in tissues is higher and CO2 concentration lower as compared to lungs

  1. How can the combination of haemoglobin and O2 in lungs be improved?
    (a) decreasing O2 concentration in blood
    (b) increasing O2 concentration in blood
    (c) increasing CO2 concentration in blood
    (d) introducing CO into the blood.

(b) increasing O2 concentration in blood

  1. What is the location of the pneumotaxic centre that can moderate the respiratory rhythm center’s function?
    (a) Dorsal side of the medulla
    (b) Ventral side of the medulla
    (c) Aortic arch and carotid artery
    (d) Pons

(d) Pons

  1. Where does the impulse for voluntary forced breathing start?
    (a) medulla
    (b) vagus nerve
    (c) spinal cord
    (d) cerebrum

(d) cerebrum

  1. What is the location of the controlling center of normal breathing in mammals?
    (a) cerebrum
    (b) cerebellum
    (c) midbrain
    (d) medulla oblongata

(d) medulla oblongata

  1. How does atmospheric air compare to alveolar air in terms of pO2 and pCO2?
    (a) pO2 lesser and pCO2 higher
    (b) pO2 higher and pCO2 lesser
    (c) Both pO2 and pCO2 lesser
    (d) Both pO2 and pCO2 higher

(b) pO2 higher and pCO2 lesser

  1. What causes asthma?
    (a) Infection of the lungs
    (b) Spasm in bronchial muscles
    (c) Bleeding into the pleural cavity
    (d) infection of trachea

(b) Spasm in bronchial muscles

  1. How much O2 is normally carried by 100 ml. of pure blood?
    (a) 40 ml.
    (b) 20 ml.
    (c) 10 ml.
    (d) 30 ml.

(b) 20 ml.

  1. What would happen if human blood becomes acidic (low pH)?
    (a) Oxygen-carrying capacity of haemoglobin decreases
    (b) Oxygen-carrying capacity of haemoglobin increases
    (c) RBC count increases
    (d) RBC count decreases

(a) Oxygen-carrying capacity of haemoglobin decreases

  1. What is the covering of the lungs called?
    (a) pericardium
    (b) perichondrium
    (c) peritoneum
    (d) pleural membrane

(d) pleural membrane

  1. What does the ciliated epithelium in mammals’ trachea do?
    (a) sucking inspired air in
    (b) perceivings sense of smell
    (c) pushing expired air out
    (d) pushing mucus out

(d) pushing mucus out

  1. Polluted air containing an unusually high concentration of what is inhaled by a patient?
    (a) carbon disulphide
    (b) chloroform
    (c) carbon dioxide
    (d) carbon monoxide

(d) carbon monoxide

  1. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
    (a) is caused by a variant of Pneumococcus pneumoniae.
    (b) is caused by a variant of the common cold virus (coronavirus).
    (c) is an acute form of asthma.
    (d) affects non-vegetarians much faster than the vegetarians.

(b) is caused by a variant of the common cold virus (coronavirus).

  1. In humans, what is the function of the concentration of carbon dioxide in the plasma?
    (a) causes increased production of hydrochloric acid.
    (b) regulates gastric acid production by forming carbonic acid.
    (c) regulates breathing rate by its effect on the medulla.
    (d) causes inflammation of the tissues of the bronchial tubes.

(c) regulates breathing rate by its effect on the medulla.

  1. If the respiratory rate of ‘A’ is 35 breaths/min and tidal volume 185 cc/breath and the respiratory rate of ‘B’ is 25 breaths/min and tidal volume 259 cc/breath, then which of the following is true?
    (a) Pulmonary ventilation of ‘A’ and ‘B’ is the same.
    (b) Alveolar ventilation of ‘A’ and ‘B’ is the same.
    (c) Pulmonary ventilation of ‘A’ is greater than ‘B’.
    (d) Alveolar ventilation of ‘A’ is greater than ‘B’.

(c) Pulmonary ventilation of ‘A’ is greater than ‘B’.

  1. CO has a higher affinity with Hb than oxygen by how many times?
    (a) 2 times
    (b) 20 times
    (c) 200 times
    (d) 2000 times

(c) 200 times

  1. Which two of the following changes usually occur in plain dwellers when they move to high altitudes (3,500 m or more)?
    (1) Increase in red blood cell size
    (2) Increase in red blood cell production
    (3) Increased breathing rate
    (4) Increase in thrombocyte count
    (a) (2) and (3)
    (b) (3) and (4)
    (c) (1) and (4)
    (d) (1) and (2)

(a) (2) and (3)

  1. How much CO2 can oxyhaemoglobin transport?
    (a) 8 ml of CO2/100 ml of blood
    (b) 5 ml of CO2/100 ml of blood
    (c) 3 ml of CO2/100 ml of blood
    (d) 2 ml of CO2/100 ml of blood

(c) 3 ml of CO2/100 ml of blood

  1. Which of the following matches is correct?
    (a) Emphysema: reduction of the surface area of alveoli and bronchi
    (b) Pneumonia: an occupational disease with asbestos
    (c) Silicosis: inflammation of alveoli
    (d) Asthma: excessive secretion of bronchial mucus

(a) Emphysema: reduction of the surface area of alveoli and bronchi

  1. What is the volume of air breathed in and out during normal breathing called?
    (a) Vital capacity
    (b) IRV
    (c) ERV
    (d) Tidal volume

(d) Tidal volume

  1. What is a much-developed larynx of a human male called?
    (a) Aristotle’s lantern
    (b) Syrinx
    (c) Adam’s apple
    (d) Muller’s organ

(c) Adam’s apple

  1. CO2 in the blood lowers pH because CO2 combines with ______ , and the rate of reaction increased by ______.
    (a) H2O to form H+ and HCO3–, carbonic anhydrase
    (b) H2O to form only HCO3–, carbonic anhydrase
    (c) H2O to form only H+, carbonic ions
    (d) H+ to form HCO3–, oxyhaemoglobin

(a) H2O to form H+ and HCO3–, carbonic anhydrase

  1. Approximately 70% of carbon dioxide absorbed by the blood will be transported to the lungs
    (a) as bicarbonate ions
    (b) in the form of dissolved gas molecules
    (c) by binding to RBC
    (d) as carbamino – haemoglobin

(a) as bicarbonate ions

  1. During oxygen transport, why does the oxyhaemoglobin at the tissue level liberate oxygen to the cells?
    (a) O2 concentration is high and CO2 is low
    (b) O2 concentration is low and CO2 is high
    (c) O2 tension is high and CO2 tension is low
    (d) O2 tension is low and CO2 tension is high

(d) O2 tension is low and CO2 tension is high

  1. What is the main cause of emphysema?
    (a) Allergy or hyper sensitisation
    (b) Spasm of the smooth muscles of bronchioles
    (c) Cigarette smoking
    (d) Inflammation of the alveoli

(c) Cigarette smoking

  1. What is a common feature of a human and the insect trachea?
    (a) Non-collapsible wall
    (b) Supporting rings
    (c) Ectodermal origin
    (d) Endodermal origin

(a) Non-collapsible wall

  1. What does 6000 to 8000 ml of air refer to?
    (a) Vital capacity of lungs
    (b) Volume of normal expiration per minute
    (c) Sum of IRV + ERV
    (d) Inspiratory capacity of lungs

(b) Volume of normal expiration per minute

  1. In the absence of oxygen, which of the following can respire?
    (a) Amoeba
    (b) Tapeworm
    (c) House fly
    (d) Hydra

(b) Tapeworm

  1. Chloride ions migrate from plasma to RBC and carbonate ions migrate from RBC to plasma through what process?
    (a) chloride shift
    (b) ionic shift
    (c) atomic shift
    (d) Na+ pump

(a) chloride shift

  1. At the site of gas exchange in the alveoli of the lungs, the air is separated from blood by?
    (a) alveolar epithelium only
    (b) alveolar epithelium and capillary endothelium
    (c) alveolar epithelium, capillary endothelium and tunica adventitia
    (d) alveolar epithelium, capillary endothelium, a thin layer of tunica media and tunica adventitia

(b) alveolar epithelium and capillary endothelium

  1. What does the quantity 1500 ml in the respiratory volumes of a normal human adult refer to?
    (a) maximum air that can be breathed in and breathed out
    (b) residual volume
    (c) expiratory reserve volume
    (d) total lung capacity

(b) residual volume

  1. After a normal expiration, the volume of air that remains in the lungs is called?
    (a) Residual volume
    (b) Vital capacity
    (c) Expiratory capacity
    (d) Functional residual capacity

(d) Functional residual capacity

  1. Carbon dioxide is transported to the lungs via the blood as?
    (a) dissolved in blood plasma
    (b) in the form of carbonic acid only
    (c) in combination with haemoglobin only
    (d) carbaminohaemoglobin and as carbonic acid

(d) carbaminohaemoglobin and as carbonic acid

  1. Despite carrying a large amount of CO2, why does blood not become acidic?
    (a) it is absorbed by the leucocytes
    (b) blood buffers play an important role in CO2 transport.
    (c) it combines with water to form H2CO3which is neutralized by NaCO3
    (d) it is continuously diffused through tissues and is not allowed to accumulate

(b) blood buffers play an important role in CO2 transport.

  1. What transports carbon dioxide from tissues to the respiratory surface?
    (a) plasma and erythrocytes
    (b) plasma
    (c) erythrocytes
    (d) erythrocytes and leucocytes

(a) plasma and erythrocytes

  1. What is the passive breathing process in humans?
    (a) Expiration
    (b) Aspiration
    (c) Inspiration
    (d) Forced breathing

(a) Expiration

  1. What transports oxygenated blood from the lungs to the heart?
    (a) Pulmonary artery
    (b) Pulmonary vein
    (c) Coronary vein
    (d) Pre-cavals

(b) Pulmonary vein

  1. What form does CO2 take during respiration?
    (a) Dissolved plasma
    (b) Sodium carbonate
    (c) KHCO3
    (d) Partly dissolved in plasma and partly in the form of sodium and potassium bicarbonate

(d) Partly dissolved in plasma and partly in the form of sodium and potassium bicarbonate

  1. Which of the following is an example of a buffer system in the blood?
    (a) Haemoglobin and oxyhaemoglobin
    (b) Oxygen and carbon dioxide
    (c) Albumin and globulin
    (d) Sodium bicarbonate and carbonic acid

(d) Sodium bicarbonate and carbonic acid

  1. In mitochondria, which enzyme is absent?
    (a) Aconitase
    (b) Malic dehydrogenase
    (c) Hexokinase
    (d) None of these

(c) Hexokinase

  1. Towards where would the oxygen curve shift if the CO2 concentration is higher?
    (a) Right
    (b) Left
    (c) Central
    (d) None of these

(a) Right

  1. What is the amount of volume of air that can be inspired/expired normally called?
    (a) Tidal volume
    (b) Vital capacity
    (c) Residual volume
    (d) Normal volume

(a) Tidal volume

  1. What does the vital capacity of the lung include?
    (a) IRV + TV + ERV
    (b) ERV + RV
    (c) ERV + TV
    (d) IRV + TV

(a) IRV + TV + ERV

  1. What is the capacity of the human lung?
    (a) 3000 ml
    (b) 1500 ml
    (c) 1000 ml
    (d) 500 ml

(a) 3000 ml

  1. Regarding the transport of respiratory gases by blood, identify the true statement.
    (a) Haemoglobin is necessary for the transport of carbon dioxide and carbonic anhydrase for the transport of oxygen
    (b) Haemoglobin is necessary for the transport of oxygen and carbonic anhydrase for the transport of carbon dioxide
    (c) Only oxygen is transported by the blood
    (d) Only carbon dioxide is transported by the blood

(b) Haemoglobin is necessary for the transport of oxygen and carbonic anhydrase for the transport of carbon dioxide

  1. Which of these has the smallest diameter?
    (a) Right primary bronchus
    (b) Left primary bronchus
    (c) Trachea
    (d) Respiratory bronchiole

(d) Respiratory bronchiole

  1. A relative proportion of CO2 released to O2 absorbed in respiration is called as?
    (a) Respiratory exchange
    (b) Respiratory quotient
    (c) Respiratory phase
    (d) None of the above

(b) Respiratory quotient

  1. Regarding respiration in humans, which of the following is the correct statement?
    (a) Cigarette smoking may lead to inflammation of the bronchi
    (b) Neural signals from the pneumotaxic centre in the pons region of the brain can increase the duration of inspiration
    (c) Workers in grinding and stone-breaking industries may suffer from lung fibrosis
    (d) About 90% of carbon dioxide (CO2) is carried by haemoglobin as carbamino haemoglobin

(c) Workers in grinding and stone-breaking industries may suffer from lung fibrosis

  1. By making a conscious effort, which of the following options is most likely for most of us concerning breathing?
    (a) One can breathe out air totally without oxygen.
    (b) One can breathe out air through eustachian tubes by closing both the nose and the mouth.
    (c) One can consciously breathe in and breathe out by moving the diaphragm alone, without moving the ribs at all.
    (d) The lungs can be made fully empty by forcefully breathing out all air from them

(b) One can breathe out air through eustachian tubes by closing both the nose and the mouth.

  1. What mammalian cell is not capable of aerobically metabolizing glucose to carbon dioxide?
    (a) Unstraited muscle cells
    (b) Liver cells
    (c) Red blood cells
    (d) White blood cells

(c) Red blood cells

  1. What causes the ‘blue baby’ syndrome?
    (a) Excess of dissolved oxygen
    (b) Excess of TDS (total dissolved solids)
    (c) Excess of chloride
    (d) Methaemoglobin

(d) Methaemoglobin

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