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Neural Control and Coordination: NEET MCQ Questions [100+ Solved]

Below are the NEET MCQ questions on Class 11 Biology Chapter “Neural Control and Coordination” based on the NCERT textbook. Solve the below free NEET mock test for a better understanding of the various topics. 100+ important MCQs (multiple choice questions) are given in this NEET question bank.

“Neural Control and Coordination” is the 21st chapter in the unit “Human Physiology” of class XI or class 11th Biology NCERT. Do note that NEET (which is conducted by NTA) is based on NCERT textbooks so they are a must-have. You can also download PDFs of NCERT textbooks.

There are dozens of NEET MCQ books out there, making it difficult for medical aspirants to decide which one to purchase. To make it easier for you, I’ve handpicked the  MOST RECOMMENDED books:

Important Questions For NEET:

You can also answer the following NEET quiz on a sheet of paper. Once you’ve completed the NEET online test series, cross-verify and calculate your score, and evaluate your performance according to the scored marks. Calculate your score by multiplying 4 by the number of correct attempts and subtracting it from the number of incorrect attempts.

I hope this will help you practice better for the NEET exam. All the best!


  1. Which is the most abundant intracellular cation?
    (a) Ca++
    (b) H+
    (c) K+
    (d) Na

(c) K+

  1. Where does a motor neuron stimulate a muscle fibre?
    (a) the neuromuscular junction
    (b) the transverse tubules
    (c) the myofibril
    (d) the sarcoplasmic reticulum

(a) the neuromuscular junction

  1. What would an injury localized to the hypothalamus most likely disrupt?
    (a) short-term memory.
    (b) co-ordination during locomotion.
    (c) executive functions, such as decision making.
    (d) regulation of body temperature.

(d) regulation of body temperature.

  1. Which one of the following statements is false?
    (a) Retinal is the light absorbing portion of visual photo pigments.
    (b) In retina the rods have the photopigment rhodopsin while cones have three different photopigments.
    (c) Retinal is a derivative of Vitamin C.
    (d) Rhodopsin is the purplish red protein present in rods only.

(c) Retinal is a derivative of Vitamin C.

  1. Even in total darkness, a gymnast can balance his body upside down. What is the reason for this?
    (a) Vestibular apparatus
    (b) Tectorial membrane
    (c) Organ of corti
    (d) Cochlea

(a) Vestibular apparatus

  1. Which of the following brain regions is incorrectly paired with its function?
    (a) Cerebellum – language comprehension
    (b) Corpus callosum – communication between the left and right cerebral cortices
    (c) Cerebrum – calculation and contemplation
    (d) Medulla oblongata – homeostatic control

(a) Cerebellum – language comprehension

  1. The ‘fovea’ is the centre of the visual field in a mammalian eye, where
    (a) the optic nerve leaves the eye
    (b) only rods are present
    (c) more rods than cones are found
    (d) high density of cones occur but has no rods.

(d) high density of cones occur but has no rods.

  1. If the anterior horn cell of the spinal cord is destroyed, what would be lost?
    (a) voluntary motor impulses
    (b) commissural impulses
    (c) integrating impulses
    (d) sensory impulses

(a) voluntary motor impulses

  1. What is the composition of the photosensitive compound in the human eye?
    (a) Guanosine and Retinol
    (b) Opsin and Retinal
    (c) Opsin and Retinol
    (d) Transducin and Retinene

(b) Opsin and Retinal

  1. What produces myelin sheath?
    (a) Astrocytes and Schwann cells
    (b) Oligodendrocytes and Osteoclasts
    (c) Osteoclasts and Astrocytes
    (d) Schwann cells and Oligodendrocytes

(d) Schwann cells and Oligodendrocytes

  1. Where are receptor sites for neurotransmitters found?
    (a) Pre-synaptic membrane
    (b) Tips of axons
    (c) Post-synaptic membrane
    (d) Membrane of synaptic vesicles

(c) Post-synaptic membrane

  1. Which one of the following is an eye disease?
    (a) hepatitis
    (b) measles
    (c) glaucoma
    (d) bronchitis

(c) glaucoma

  1. What part of the brain is affected by hearing impairment?
    (a) Frontal lobe
    (b) Parietal lobe
    (c) Temporal lobe
    (d) Cerebellum

(c) Temporal lobe

  1. What is the location of the black pigment in the eye that reduces internal reflection?
    (a) retina
    (b) iris
    (c) cornea
    (d) sclerotic

(a) retina

  1. Where are bipolar nerve cells present?
    (a) Skin tactile corpuscles
    (b) Spinal cord
    (c) Retina of the eye
    (d) All the above

(c) Retina of the eye

  1. The opening of what are fenestra ovalis?
    (a) Cranium
    (b) Tympanum
    (c) Tympanic cavity
    (d) Brain

(c) Tympanic cavity

  1. Where are multipolar nerve cells found?
    (a) Cochlea
    (b) Dorsal root ganglia of spinal cord
    (c) Retina of the eye
    (d) Brain

(b) Dorsal root ganglia of spinal cord

  1. A neuron receives signals from its ______and sends signals to other neurons through its ______.
    (a) dendrites … receptors
    (b) end feet … cell bodies and dendrites
    (c) cell bodies and dendrites … axons
    (d) transmitter vesicles … axons

(c) cell bodies and dendrites … axons

  1. What is the insulating layer of fat that surrounds nerve fibres called?
    (a) Adipose sheath
    (b) Myelin sheath
    (c) Hyaline sheath
    (d) Peritoneum

(b) Myelin sheath

  1. Which one of the following cells stops dividing after birth?
    (a) Epithelium
    (b) Neuron
    (c) Glial cells
    (d) Liver

(b) Neuron

  1. Which parts of the neurons perform basic cellular functions such as protein synthesis?
    (a) Axons
    (b) Dendrites
    (c) Synaptic knobs
    (d) Soma

(d) Soma

  1. Which neurotransmitter is not excitatory in function?
    (a) Serotonin
    (b) Dopamine
    (c) Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)
    (d) Acetylcholine

(c) Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)

  1. Which of the following parts of the brain are included in the brain- stem?
    (a) Forebrain and midbrain
    (b) Mid-brain and hindbrain
    (c) Forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain
    (d) Hindbrain only

(b) Mid-brain and hindbrain

  1. A nerve fibre initiates a nerve impulse only when the membrane becomes more permeable to what?
    (a) Adrenaline
    (b) Phosphorus
    (c) Sodium ions
    (d) Potassium ions

(c) Sodium ions

  1. What do nerve cells have at the resting stage?
    (a) Low K+ outside and high Na+ inside
    (b) High K+ inside and high Na+ outside
    (c) High K+ inside and low Na+ outside
    (d) High K+ outside and low Na+ inside

(b) High K+ inside and high Na+ outside

  1. What is involved in the depolarization of nerve impulses?
    (a) Entry of Na+ only
    (b) Entry of K+ only
    (c) Entry of Na+ and exit of K+
    (d) Entry of K+ and exit of Na+

(c) Entry of Na+ and exit of K+

  1. Where is the node of Ranvier found?
    (a) Muscle bundles
    (b) Dendrite
    (c) Axon
    (d) Right auricle

(c) Axon

  1. Sodium – Potassium pump across membranes, actively transporting what?
    (a) 2 Na ions outwards and 3 K ions into the cell
    (b) 3 Na ions outwards and 2 K ions into the cell
    (c) 2 K ions outwards and 3 Na ions into the cell
    (d) 3 K ions outwards and 2 Na ions into the cell

(d) 3 K ions outwards and 2 Na ions into the cell

  1. Which of the following are the correct directions for the travel direction of a nervous impulse?
    (a) Dendrite, nerve cell body, axon
    (b) Axon, nerve cell body, dendrite
    (c) Nerve cell body, axon, dendrite
    (d) Dendrite, axon, nerve cell body

(a) Dendrite, nerve cell body, axon

  1. Saltatory conduction means that the membrane potential changes ______.
    (a) along the entire length of the axon
    (b) only where there is an imbalance between the salts present
    (c) in an all-or-none fashion
    (d) only at the nodes of Ranvier

(d) only at the nodes of Ranvier

  1. Which is the correct statement?
    (a) Electrical synapses are more common in our neural system than chemical synapses
    (b) The new potential in postsynaptic neurons may be either excitatory or inhibitory
    (c) Hypothalamus is the major coordination centre for sensory and motor signaling
    (d) The tracts of nerve fibres that connect two cerebral hemispheres are called corpora bigemina

(b) The new potential in postsynaptic neurons may be either excitatory or inhibitory

  1. What is the cerebral cortex?
    (a) The outer layer of the cerebrum, called white matter
    (b) Inner layer of the cerebrum, called white matter
    (c) The outer layer of the cerebrum, called grey matter
    (d) Inner layer of the cerebrum, called grey matter

(c) The outer layer of the cerebrum, called grey matter

  1. The part of the brain that regulates the body’s temperature, hunger, and water balance is?
    (a) Hypothalamus
    (b) Infundibulum
    (c) Medulla oblongata
    (d) Pons varolii

(a) Hypothalamus

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid is formed by which of the following?
    (a) Choroid plexus
    (b) Dura mater
    (c) Arachnoid mater
    (d) Cerebrum and spinal cord

(a) Choroid plexus

  1. What is arbor vitae composed of?
    (a) Neuroglea cells
    (b) Grey matter
    (c) White matter
    (d) All of these

(c) White matter

  1. Which of the following is a richly vascular layer with lots of blood capillaries?
    (a) Duramater of brain
    (b) Piamater of spinal cord
    (c) Epidermis of skin
    (d) Epithelial lining of the trachea

(b) Piamater of spinal cord

  1. What is false about the neural basis of the knee-jerk reflex in humans?
    (a) The leg extensor is stimulated to contract by the motor neuron in this reflex loop.
    (b) The only synapses between neurons involved in this loop occur in the spinal cord.
    (c) The basic response is a polysynaptic circuit containing several interneurons.
    (d) Conscious action can modify the basic reflex because of the action of interneurons.

(c) The basic response is a polysynaptic circuit containing several interneurons.

  1. What is the function of the cerebellum of the brain?
    (a) concerned with the maintenance of posture/equilibrium
    (b) responsible for olfactory functions
    (c) controls optic functions
    (d) both (a) and (c)

(a) concerned with the maintenance of posture/equilibrium

  1. Find the mismatch between the organ/innervation.
    (a) Glossopharyngeal nerve-tongue
    (b) Optic nerve-Eye
    (c) Facial nerve-Olfactory epithelium
    (d) Cochlear nerve-Spiral organ

(c) Facial nerve-Olfactory epithelium

  1. Which of the following correctly traces the energy of sound waves into the ear?
    (a) Auditory canal-eardrum-ear bones-cochlea
    (b) Eardrum-auditory canal-cochlea-ear bones
    (c) Auditory canal-ear bones-eardrum-cochlea
    (d) Eardrum-auditory canal-ear bones-cochlea

(a) Auditory canal-eardrum-ear bones-cochlea

  1. The anterior chamber receives the aqueous humor secreted by the ciliary body in the posterior chamber through?
    (a) the pupil
    (b) the scleral venous sinus
    (c) the vitreous body
    (d) the suspensory ligament

(a) the pupil

  1. What controls reflex action?
    (a) Sympathetic nervous system
    (b) Autonomic nervous system
    (c) Spinal cord
    (d) Peripheral nervous system

(c) Spinal cord

  1. Which of the following reflexes does not involve brain innervation?
    (a) Spinal reflex
    (b) Cranial reflex
    (c) Afferent reflex
    (d) Efferent reflex

(a) Spinal reflex

  1. Which one of the following is not a reflex action?
    (a) Swallowing of food
    (b) Shivering in the cold
    (c) Salivation at choicest food
    (d) Closure of eyelid by flashing light

(b) Shivering in the cold

  1. In which of the following is the perception of colour possible?
    (a) Birds
    (b) Reptiles
    (c) Men
    (d) Both (a) and (c)

(d) Both (a) and (c)

  1. Where is aqueous humor present?
    (a) In front of the retina
    (b) In front of the cornea
    (c) Behind the conjunctiva
    (d) In front of the lens

(d) In front of the lens

  1. What is present/absent in the blind spot where the optic nerves exits the eye?
    (a) Rods and cones are absent
    (b) Only cones are present
    (c) Only rods are present
    (d) Special neurons are present

(a) Rods and cones are absent

  1. What cells are present in the yellow spot or fovea centralis?
    (a) Rods and cones
    (b) Only rods
    (c) Only cones
    (d) Predominantly rods

(c) Only cones

  1. Rods and cones of retina are modified
    (a) Hair
    (b) Unipolar neurons
    (c) Bipolar neurons
    (d) Multipolar neurons

(c) Bipolar neurons

  1. Mammalian eyes controls the power of accommodation by changing the shape of their lenses.This is controlled by
    (a) Cornea
    (b) Pupil
    (c) Iris
    (d) Ciliary body

(d) Ciliary body

  1. UV radiation causes which of the following eye disorders?
    (a) Cataract
    (b) Glaucoma
    (c) Dilation pupil
    (d) Some defect of retina

(a) Cataract

  1. Where are bipolar neurons loacted?
    (a) Vertebrate embryos
    (b) Retina of eye
    (c) Brain and spinal cord
    (d) Skeletal muscles

(b) Retina of eye

  1. Before excitation, what is the potential difference between the inside and outside of a nerve?
    (a) Spike potential
    (b) Reaction potential
    (c) Action potential
    (d) Resting potential

(d) Resting potential

  1. What is the numbering of the cranial nerve – vagus nerve?
    (a) 10th
    (b) 9th
    (c) 5th
    (d) 8th

(a) 10th

  1. The sensation of stomach pain is caused by what?
    (a) interoceptors
    (b) exteroceptors
    (c) teloreceptors
    (d) all of these

(a) interoceptors

  1. What is an example of a conditioned reflex?
    (a) Eyes closed when anything enters into it.
    (b) Hand taken up when piercing with a needle.
    (c) Salivation in a hungry dog in response to the ringing of a bell.
    (d) Digestion food goes forward in the alimentary canal.

(c) Salivation in a hungry dog in response to the ringing of a bell.

  1. The field of otorhinolaryngology is concerned with?
    (a) brain cells
    (b) bird anatomy
    (c) locomotory organs
    (d) ENT

(d) ENT

  1. Even if a frog’s brain is crushed, its leg will move on pinpointing. What is this called
    (a) simple reflex
    (b) conditional reflex
    (c) neurotransmitter function
    (d) autonomic nerve conditions

(a) simple reflex

  1. What is an example of a negative feedback loop in humans?
    (a) Secretion of tears after falling of sand particles into the eye.
    (b) Salivation of the mouth at the sight of delicious food
    (c) Secretion of sweat glands and constriction of skin blood vessels when it is too hot
    (d) Constriction of skin blood vessels and contraction of skeletal muscles when it is too cold

(d) Constriction of skin blood vessels and contraction of skeletal muscles when it is too cold

  1. During the propagation of a nerve impulse, the action potential results from the movement of?
    (a) K+ ions from extracellular fluid to intracellular fluid
    (b) Na+ ions from intracellular fluid to extracellular fluid
    (c) K+ ions from intracellular fluid to extracellular fluid
    (d) Na+ ions from extracellular fluid to intracellular fluid

(d) Na+ ions from extracellular fluid to intracellular fluid

  1. Why is cornea transplant in humans rarely rejected?
    (a) its cells are least penetrable by bacteria
    (b) it has no blood supply
    (c) it is composed of enucleated cells
    (d) it is a non-living layer

(b) it has no blood supply

  1. In humans, deficiency of what is associated with Alzheimer’s disease?
    (a) glutamic acid
    (b) acetylcholine
    (c) gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)
    (d) dopamine

(b) acetylcholine

  1. Body temperature is regulated by which part of the human brain?
    (a) Cerebellum
    (b) Cerebrum
    (c) Hypothalamus
    (d) Medulla oblongata

(c) Hypothalamus

  1. When a neuron is not conductiong any impulse i.e. in a resting state, the axonal membrane is
    (a) comparatively more permeable to Na+ ions and nearly impermeable to K+ ions
    (b) equally permeable to both Na+ and K+ ions
    (c) impermeable to both Na+ and K+ ions
    (d) comparatively more permeable to K+ ions and nearly impermeable to Na+ ions

(d) comparatively more permeable to K+ ions and nearly impermeable to Na+ ions

  1. What controls the secretion of gastric juice?
    (a) Cerebellum
    (b) ANS
    (c) Cerebrum
    (d) Medulla

(d) Medulla

  1. What provides the energy required during the transmission of impulse?
    (a) Brain
    (b) Nerve fibre
    (c) Liver
    (d) Stimulating agent

(b) Nerve fibre

  1. In humans, which part of the brain is more developed?
    (a) Medulla
    (b) Cerebellum
    (c) Cerebrum
    (d) Optic lobes

(c) Cerebrum

  1. What is the number of cranial nerves in a human being?
    (a) 10 pairs
    (b) 20 pairs
    (c) 6 pairs
    (d) 12 pairs

(d) 12 pairs

  1. Which of the following is a thin vascular membrane of the brain?
    (a) Arachnoid
    (b) Pia mater
    (c) Dura meter
    (d) Epineurium

(b) Pia mater

  1. The cerebellum is concerned with what?
    (a) memory
    (b) perception
    (c) intelligence
    (d) coordination of muscular movement

(d) coordination of muscular movement

  1. Twilight vision is also known as
    (a) Scotopic vision and is the function of rods
    (b) Scotopic vision and is the function of cones
    (c) Photopic vision and is the function of rods
    (d) Photopic vision and is the function of cones

(a) Scotopic vision and is the function of rods

  1. How is the energy transformation in the nervous system?
    (a) Chemical to radiant
    (b) Chemical to mechanical
    (c) Chemical to electrical
    (d) Chemical to osmotic

(c) Chemical to electrical

  1. Which one of the following pairs is mismatching?
    (a) Cerebrum-Memory
    (b) Cerebellum-Equilibrium of body
    (c) Olfactory lobes – Smell
    (d) Medulla – Temperature

(d) Medulla – Temperature

  1. What is the name of cranial nerves of human beings viz. II, VII, VIII, IX
    (a) Optic, auditory, facial, hypoglossal
    (b) Oculomotor, auditory, abducens, hypoglossal
    (c) Optic, facial, auditory, glossopharyngeal
    (d) Optic, facial, abducens, glossopharyngeal

(c) Optic, facial, auditory, glossopharyngeal

  1. Several nervous system diseases result from a loss of support cells or substances produced by support cells (such as myelin). What is the primary function of these support cells?
    (a) act as supporting structures within nervous tissue.
    (b) produce insulating material around axons.
    (c) assist in the conduction of impulses along neurons.
    (d) All of the above

(d) All of the above

  1. Complex interactions within what regulates homeostasis?
    (a) hypothalamus
    (b) pituitary gland
    (c) thalamus
    (d) All of these

(d) All of these

  1. CNS white matter is always
    (a) deep to the grey matter
    (b) unmyelinated
    (c) arranged into tracts
    (d) composed of sensory fibres only

(c) arranged into tracts

  1. Which of the following is not a part of the forebrain?
    (a) Rhiencephalon
    (b) Rhombencephalon
    (c) Diencephalon
    (d) Telencephalon

(b) Rhombencephalon

  1. What are clusters of neuron cell bodies embedded in the white matter of the brain known as?
    (a) Nuclei
    (b) Gyri
    (c) Sulci
    (d) Ganglia

(a) Nuclei

  1. Which part of the brain controls involuntary breathing?
    (a) Diencephalon
    (b) Hypothalamus
    (c) Medulla oblongata
    (d) Cerebellum

(c) Medulla oblongata

  1. If a person has lost his memory in an accident, which part of the brain has got injured?
    (a) Diencephalon
    (b) Medulla oblongata
    (c) Cerebellum
    (d) Cerebrum

(d) Cerebrum

  1. What is the name of the cranial nerve that is both sensory and motor in man?
    (a) Olfactory
    (b) Trigeminal
    (c) Optic
    (d) Auditory

(b) Trigeminal

  1. The movement of the eye has the involvement of which cranial nerves?
    (a) Optic, oculomotor, abducens
    (b) Occulomotor, abducens, trochlear
    (c) Trochlear, abducens and optic
    (d) Abducens, optic, trochlear, oculomotor

(b) Occulomotor, abducens, trochlear

  1. Which human cranial nerve is the smallest?
    (a) Trochlear
    (b) Opthalmic
    (c) Abducens
    (d) Vagus

(a) Trochlear

  1. Which part of the human hindbrain is responsible for hand-eye coordination?
    (a) Cerebellum
    (b) pons varolii
    (c) Medulla oblongata
    (d) Thalamus

(a) Cerebellum

  1. In the body, which is the pneumotaxic centre?
    (a) Heart
    (b) Lung
    (c) Medulla
    (d) Liver

(c) Medulla

  1. What is the sequence of reflex arc?
    (a) sense organ, spinal cord, motor neuron, sensory nerve, muscle
    (b) sense organ, sensory, neuron, motor neuron, spinal cord, muscle
    (c) sense organ, motor neuron, spinal cord, sensory neuron, muscle
    (d) sense organ, motor neuron, spinal cord, sensory neuron, muscle

(c) sense organ, motor neuron, spinal cord, sensory neuron, muscle

  1. In the rod type of photoreceptor cells of the human eye, the purplish red pigment rhodopsin is a derivative of?
    (a) vitamin B1
    (b) vitamin C
    (c) vitamin D
    (d) vitamin A

(a) vitamin B1

  1. Nissl’s granules are found in the ______ and are composed of _____ respectively.
    (a) Muscle cells and deoxyribonucleic acid
    (b) Mast cells and RNA
    (c) Osteocytes and DNA
    (d) Neuron and RNA

(d) Neuron and RNA

  1. Which part of the brain is concerned with muscular movement?
    (a) Cerebellum
    (b) Thalamus
    (c) Hippocampus
    (d) Temporal lobe of cerebrum

(a) Cerebellum

  1. What are chemicals that are released at the synaptic junction called?
    (a) hormones
    (b) neurotransmitters
    (c) cerebrospinal fluid
    (d) lymph

(b) neurotransmitters

  1. What maintains resting membrane potential?
    (a) hormones
    (b) neurotransmitters
    (c) ion pumps
    (d) None of these

(c) ion pumps

  1. What controls the functions of our visceral organs?
    (a) sympathetic and somatic neural system
    (b) sympathetic and parasympathetic neural system
    (c) central and somatic nervous system
    (d) None of the above

(b) sympathetic and parasympathetic neural system

  1. In a knee-jerk reflex, which of the following is not involved?
    (a) Muscle spindle
    (b) Motor neuron
    (c) Brain
    (d) Inter neurons

(c) Brain

  1. Which of the following is an area in the brain associated with strong emotions?
    (a) cerebral cortex
    (b) cerebellum
    (c) limbic system
    (d) medulla

(c) limbic system

  1. Rhodopsin contains which vitamin?
    (a) vit. A
    (b) vit. B
    (c) vit. C
    (d) vit. C

(a) vit. A

  1. Which are the three layers of the human eyeball?
    (a) lens, iris, optic nerve
    (b) lens, aqueous humor and vitreous humor
    (c) cornea, lens, iris
    (d) cornea, lens, optic nerve

(b) lens, aqueous humor and vitreous humor

  1. The wax gland present in the ear canal is also called
    (a) sweat gland
    (b) prostate gland
    (c) Cowper’s gland
    (d) sebaceous gland/ceruminous gland

(d) sebaceous gland/ceruminous gland

  1. Which part of the internal ear is responsible for hearing?
    (a) cochlea
    (b) semicircular canal
    (c) utriculus
    (d) sacculus

(a) cochlea

  1. Where is the organ of corti, a structure, present?
    (a) external ear
    (b) middle ear
    (c) semicircular canal
    (d) cochlea

(d) cochlea

  1. Carotene-rich foods are essential for good vision. Choose the best option from the following statements
    (i) Vitamin A derivatives are formed from carotene
    (ii) The photopigments are embedded in the membrane discs of the inner segment
    (iii) Retinal is a derivative of Vitamin A
    (iv) Retinal is a light absorbing part of all the visual photopigments
    (a) (i), (iii) and (iv)
    (b) (i) and (iii)
    (c) (ii), (iii) and (iv)
    (d) (i) and (iv)

(a) (i), (iii) and (iv)

  1. Mental disorders do not include which of the following?
    (a) Epilepsy
    (b) Neurosis
    (c) Psychosis
    (d) Plague

(d) Plague

  1. What is the 5th cranial nerve of a frog called?
    (a) optic nerve
    (b) vagus nerve
    (c) trigeminal nerve
    (d) olfactory nerve

(c) trigeminal nerve

  1. Lead zirconate crystals are a key component for?
    (a) electroencephalography
    (b) electrocardiography
    (c) magnetoencephalography
    (d) sonography

(d) sonography

  1. When the vagus nerve is stimulated excessively in humans, what may happen?
    (a) hoarse voice
    (b) peptic ulcers
    (c) efficient digestion of proteins
    (d) irregular contraction of the diaphragm

(d) irregular contraction of the diaphragm

  1. A person is wearing spectacles with concave lenses for correcting vision. Without the glasses, where will the image of a distant object be formed?
    (a) on the blind spot
    (b) behind the retina
    (c) in front of the retina
    (d) on the yellow spot

(c) in front of the retina

  1. What is the reason for unidirectional transmission of a nerve impulse through nerve fibre?
    (a) nerve fibre is insulated by a medullary sheath.
    (b) sodium pump starts operating only at the cyton and then continues into the nerve fibre.
    (c) neurotransmitters are released by dendrites and not by axon endings.
    (d) neurotransmitters are released by the axon endings and not by dendrites

(d) neurotransmitters are released by the axon endings and not by dendrites

  1. A person who exhibits unpredictable moods, outbursts of emotion, and quarrelsome behaviour suffers from?
    (a) borderline personality disorder (BPD)
    (b) mood disorder
    (c) addictive disorder
    (d) schizophrenia

(a) borderline personality disorder (BPD)

  1. Human eyes are sensitive only to light with wavelengths between?
    (a) 80 to 280 nanometre
    (b) 380 to 760 nanometre
    (c) 780 to 870 nanometre
    (d) 880 to 980 nanometre

(b) 380 to 760 nanometre

  1. The rays of light in the myopia eye defect
    (a) Do not enter the eye at all
    (b) Come to a focus at the back of the retina
    (c) Come to a focus in front of the retina
    (d) Come to a focus in between retina & iris

(c) Come to a focus in front of the retina

  1. What is the the frequency of sound waves heard by our ears?
    (a) 20 to 20,000 cycles/sec
    (b) 1000 to 2000 cycles/sec
    (c) 5000 to 7000 cycles/sec
    (d) 5000 to 10,000 cycles/sec

(a) 20 to 20,000 cycles/sec

  1. The ear drum is also known as
    (a) Tympanic membrane
    (b) Tensor tympani
    (c) Scala tympani
    (d) Scala vestibuli

(a) Tympanic membrane

  1. What would happen if suddenly the light source in front of an eye becomes bright?
    (a) Focus of lens will change
    (b) Retinal blood supply will be cut
    (c) Vitreous humor becomes fluid
    (d) Pupil will contract

(d) Pupil will contract

  1. In mammals, what is the small canal leading from pinna into the head?
    (a) Haversian canal
    (b) Ext. auditory meatus
    (c) Inguinal canal
    (d) Eustachian tube

(b) Ext. auditory meatus

  1. Where is stereoscopic vision found?
    (a) All mammals
    (b) All vertebrates
    (c) Primates
    (d) Frog

(c) Primates

  1. The fenestra ovalis opens at?
    (a) Cranium
    (b) Tympanum
    (c) Tympanic cavity
    (d) Brain

(c) Tympanic cavity

  1. For the synthesis of rhodopsin, which food is required?
    (a) Mango
    (b) Rice
    (c) Carrot
    (d) Tomatoes

(c) Carrot

  1. Why does image formation not occur on blind-spot of the retina?
    (a) It is not present on the optical axis of the eye
    (b) Here cones and rods are absent
    (c) On this part only cones are present
    (d) The nerve fibres of this region do not contribute to the formation of the optic chiasma

(b) Here cones and rods are absent

  1. Where is “Telescopic vision” found?
    (a) Amphibians
    (b) Mammals
    (c) Birds
    (d) None of these

(c) Birds

  1. What is the circular canal found in the limbus part of eyes called?
    (a) Hyaloid canal
    (b) Canal of Schlemm
    (c) Canal of Cloquet
    (d) Eustachian tube

(b) Canal of Schlemm

  1. The middle ear is filled with what?
    (a) Air
    (b) Endolymph
    (c) Perilymph
    (d) Cerebrospinal fluid

(a) Air

  1. In the eyeball, which are the three layers from inside out?
    (a) Retina, choroid, sclerotic
    (b) Choroid, retina, sclerotic
    (c) Sclerotic, choroid, retina
    (d) Sclerotic, retina, choroid

(a) Retina, choroid, sclerotic

  1. What secretes aqueous humor and vitreous humor?
    (a) Iris
    (b) Ciliary body
    (c) Lens
    (d) Cornea

(b) Ciliary body

  1. What is/are the correct pair(s) of the following?
    (a) Semicircular canal – Balancing
    (b) Cochlea – Hearing
    (c) Utriculus & sacculus – Balancing & hearing
    (d) All of the above

(d) All of the above

  1. Impulses are carried by afferent nerve fibres from where to where?
    (a) Effector organs to the central nervous system
    (b) Receptors to the central nervous system
    (c) Central nervous system to muscles
    (d) Central nervous system to receptors

(b) Receptors to the central nervous system

  1. Four healthy people in their twenties got involved in injuries resulting in damage and death of a few cells of the following. Which of the following cells is least likely to be replaced by new ones?
    (a) Liver cells
    (b) Neurons
    (c) Malpighian layer of the skin
    (d) Osteocytes

(b) Neurons

  1. The abducens nerve is injured in a man. What function will be affected?
    (a) Movement of the eyeball
    (b) Movement of the tongue
    (c) Swallowing
    (d) Movement of the neck

(a) Movement of the eyeball

  1. When nerve impulses are transmitted through a nerve fibre, what type of electric change occurs on the potential on the inner side of the plasma membrane?
    (a) First positive, then negative and continue to be positive
    (b) First negative, then positive and continue to be positive.
    (c) First positive, then negative and again back to positive
    (d) First negative, then positive and again back to negative.

(d) First negative, then positive and again back to negative.


Other Chapters:

Class 11

Class 12


Good luck Medicoholics! Until next time.

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